Research: Graduate Landscape Photographers – Source

During my research, I decided to consider the work of contemporary landscape photography graduates as a means of accessing pre-existing work being produced within a field of interest, as well as an opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the contextual and aesthetic direction of other students when considering environmental issues.

Throughout these three examples, I found that there was a fairly consistent approach and theme to the images, although, each offered their own distinctive aesthetic take on their subject matter.

I found this to be constructive in reassuring the relevant of broad issues involved within my own practice including man’s relation to nature and the importance of preserving land and national heritage.

It also offered reassurance that other practitioners at my level were not producing work following my intended theme or narrative, asserting that my potential approach is still fairly untouched and original.

http://www.source.ie/graduate/2013/rochuncaba/rochuncaba_student_12_36_51_10-05-13/rochuncaba_student_12_36_51_10-05-13.php

This is an article that featured within source magazine’s online page and discusses the work of Robin Albrecht, a recent photography graduate from UCA Rochester. Explored examines man’s relation to nature, highlighting the question, ‘how far do we actually need to go to reach a place where we can rid ourselves of all signs of mankind to be able to connect with ourselves on a deeper level?’

Explored

The series Explored examines man’s relation to nature. Even in the most remote parts of Great Britain there are clear visible hints and signs of humanity in the landscape. How far do we actually need to go to reach a place where we can rid ourselves of all signs of mankind to be able to connect with ourselves on a deeper level? Explored is a series of photographs that Albrecht took passing through the British countryside contemplating this notion of getting to know oneself better on a different plane. The series takes the viewer on this journey in search of a landscape that is untouched. However, is there still such a place? The photographs were taken around Wales and Scotland.

Robin Albrecht - UCA Rochester

Robin Albrecht - UCA Rochester

Robin Albrecht - UCA Rochester

Robin Albrecht - UCA Rochester

Robin Albrecht - UCA Rochester

http://www.source.ie/graduate/2013/herecollba/herecollba_student_10_28_19_08-05-13/herecollba_student_10_28_19_08-05-13.php

This is an article that featured within source magazine’s online page and discusses the work of Ben Herron, a recent photography graduate from Hereford College of Arts. The featured work focuses on an area in the Peak District Padley Gorge.

Ben Herron is a landscape photographer exploring the British landscape considering what is natural and how people interact with and impact on nature. This work focuses on an area in the Peak District Padley Gorge. This work is experimentation with the equipment and process of ‘raw’ photography, working with Harman’s direct positive paper and a pinhole camera the simplest illustration of light reflecting off the landscape. He is trying to make an image with the minimum amount of manipulation to give a pureness to the images. There are now only two steps in the process that he has control over, The initial exposure of the paper and the time spent in developer.

Ben Herron  - Hereford College of Arts

Ben Herron  - Hereford College of Arts

Ben Herron  - Hereford College of Arts

Ben Herron  - Hereford College of Arts

Ben Herron  - Hereford College of Arts

http://www.source.ie/graduate/2013/dublinstba/dublinstba_student_06_43_51_14-05-13/dublinstba_student_06_43_51_14-05-13.php

This is an article that featured within source magazine’s online page and discusses the work of Jonathan Higgins, a recent photography graduate from the Dublin Institute of Technology. Six Feet Over is about a raised bog that is now designated as Special Areas of Conservation and aims to reinforce the importance of honouring the country’s heritage and traditions as well as protecting our landscape for future generations.

Six Feet Over

This project is about a raised bog that is now designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC), protected under the European Union Habitats Directive. A total of 53 sites fall under this protection status in Ireland. In May 2012, illegal turf cutting brought one of these bogs to public attention. At Monivea in County Galway, turf-cutters have struggled to comply with the new laws. Using the raised face of the bog as an allegorical ‘barrier’ between the forces of preservation (of the delicate ecosystem) and the long standing tradition of turf cutting (fuel and community). Six Feet Over aims to generate debate on the importance of honoring the country’s heritage and traditions but also protecting our landscape for future generations.

Jonathan  Higgins - Dublin Institute of Technology

Jonathan  Higgins - Dublin Institute of Technology

Jonathan  Higgins - Dublin Institute of Technology

Jonathan  Higgins - Dublin Institute of Technology

Jonathan  Higgins - Dublin Institute of Technology

I will continue my research.

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